Articles Tagged with appeals

Some criminal cases are not resolved at the end of the jury trial or after a plea has been entered. The defense attorney and state prosecutor can ask the court to reconsider a ruling or address a problem with the trial at the end through various oral and written motions. Some items however, can only be addressed on appeal.

Common Reasons for an Appeal

Just because you are not happy with the result of the criminal case does not mean you have a reason, or basis, to appeal. Common reasons people appeal criminal convictions are as follows:

  • Bad ruling by the judge;
  • Prosecutor failed to turn over evidence;
  • Defense lawyer made a mistake; or
  • Jury returned the wrong verdict.

What is an Appeal?

An appeal is not a new trial. Instead, it is a limited review of a problem with the conviction. No new evidence is introduced, no one testifies, and the case is not retried. Misdemeanor appeals are heard before the Appellate Division of the Superior Court; felony appeals are decided before the California Court of Appeals.

Limited Time Window to Appeal

Once you are convicted of a crime, following a bench or jury trial, you have the right to appeal. There is a strict timeline to file an appeal. You have 30 to 60 days after the conviction to file an appeal. The only exception to this rule are cases in which the defendant receives a death sentence. In California, a death sentence automatically triggers an appellate review.

What if I Pled Guilty?

If the criminal conviction is based on a plea before the trial, many times a condition of the plea agreement is that the criminal defendant waive his or her right to appeal as to the plea and sentence. You may have agreed to waive your right to an appeal if your conviction is based on a guilty plea. Review appellate options with your attorney prior to agreeing to a plea and most certainly after a conviction following bench or jury trial.

Do I Have to Pay an Attorney Again?

Keep in mind that appeals are a new case for the criminal defense attorney. Your original retainer or letter of engagement will not cover an appeal. You will need to enter into a new agreement with a criminal defense lawyer to represent you during the appeal. Continue reading