Articles Tagged with bail bonds

 

When you are under arrest by the police, your first thought might be, “Will I go to jail?” If you do go to jail, then your first thought might be, “How can I get out of here?” One way you can get out of jail is to post bail with the law enforcement agency that has you in custody. Your experienced criminal defense attorney can provide bail assistance by working to get the bail reduced.

Three Ways to Get Released from Jail

There are three ways for defendants to get released from jail – bail, cash bail, and on their own recognizance (OR). Although this article’s primary focus is the bail option, you should be aware of the other two options. These options are:

  • Cash bail – paying the full amount of bail in cash
  •  O.R. – your own recognizance

How Does Bail Work in San Diego?

Depending upon the severity of the crime you are accused of, the bail amount will be a high amount or low amount. When a person is put in jail, the bail is set at a monetary value. For instance, the bail for a DUI causing injury, according to the San Diego County Court Bail Schedule, is $20,000. For murder, there is no bail. 

Hearing the bail amounts can be confusing to people. Some family members are unable to pay the bail amount, which leaves their loved ones sitting in jail, for even a simple misdemeanor.

The way bail works is that the bail will be set at a certain amount, but through the use of a bail bondsman or bail company, only 10% of the bail is necessary to get out of jail.

Example of How Bail Works

The way bail works is serious business. Imagine that your bail is set at $2,000. When you hire a bail company, the company will cover the entire $2,000, in exchange for a $200 fee. When you show up to all of your court hearings, the company will get their $2,000 back, and still keep your $200. This is how the bail company makes a profit.

If you fail to appear at your court hearings and skip out on the bail that was paid for you, a bounty hunter may be sent to locate you and take you back to jail so they can recover their funds. Continue reading

Adding to the already long list of criminal justice reforms enacted in 2016, it is reported that for next year, California lawmakers plan to make it a top priority to reform the system through which judges award criminal bail, saying courts across the state are “punishing the poor for being poor.”

Assemblyman Rob Bonta and Sen. Bob Hertzberg said they plan to introduce bills stating the Legislature intends to enact laws that will reduce the number of people detained before trial and address the racial and economic disparities in the bail process. It is still under deliberation what the details of these bills will be. The lawmakers have put together a broad coalition of organizations and lawmakers to tackle the issue, but they predict that the insurance and bail industry lobby will be reform’s biggest opponents.

The bail system has seen unprecedented momentum towards reform. In October of 2015 a lawsuit was filed against the state of California alleging that the current fixed bail scheduled system is unconstitutional and does not provide equal opportunities for wealthy and poor incarcerated individuals. San Francisco’s attorney general Dennis Herrera has already come out publicly against California’s bail system.