Articles Tagged with deportation

A couple in San Diego, Carlos Nieblas-Ortiz and Martha Valenzuela-Luna, were reportedly stopped by two deputies in Mission Valley for a cracked windshield. They had their two children with them, one of whom is currently a DACA recipient. Once they were stopped, they were turned over to federal immigration officials. Nieblas-Ortiz said deputies never asked them for their immigration status, and did not issue a citation, but they were prevented from leaving.  Instead, deputies called U.S. Border Patrol, and the family was forced to wait over an hour.  Nieblas-Ortiz was released on bail, but he has told Telemundo 20 he is still not sure about whether they will be deported.

Mr. Ortiz’s attorney states that his client had presented his license and was not issued a ticket.  Instead, officers called immigration officials on them without informing them what was happening.

This incident has sparked some questions regarding police protocol. On January 25, 2017, Donald Trump issued an executive order authorizing local law enforcement agencies to deport undocumented immigrants who have criminal records. Many living in San Diego County feared that local law enforcement officers would be called to enforce federal immigration law even though San Diego County Sheriff’s Department (SDPO) has already stated they will not be stopping and arresting people based on immigration status.

The SDPO claims that in this case, deputies saw the low-riding truck in Mission Bay, a familiar spot for traffickers to unload drugs that will then get picked up by other cars, so this was a narcotics and therefore, a criminal case.

Do You Have to Provide ID? How Long can You be Detained?

Immigration and criminal law interactions are getting more heated and confusing than ever.  Being in the country without documentation is currently not a criminal act that California police departments are actively enforcing. Police may not arrest someone soley for refusing to show ID, as long as the request for ID is not reasonably related to the scope of the stop. However, what is “reasonably related” has never been clearly defined. For example, if you were pulled over for a traffic violation, then police have the right to ask for your ID since your right to drive is related to having a driver’s license/ID.

How long police can detain someone without formal charges has also not been clearly defined. The litmus test is typically “as long as it reasonably takes to conduct the investigation.”  However, police will argue that an hour’s wait for immigration officials is reasonable, as they cannot control the wait time. Continue reading

A young man named Juan Manuel Montes Bojorquez, 23, who may be the first “dreamer” to be deported under the Trump administration, has filed what could be the first “dreamer” lawsuit against the administration in San Diego federal court. The lawsuit demands the government release information about his case under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), to find out why he was deported.

Mr. Montes was deported back to Mexico after being stopped by a border officer on a bike in Calexico on February 17th. He did not have any ID on him when he was detained. It is reported that Montes was not given an opportunity to see an immigration judge or attorney, and that he was escorted across the border in Mexicali without the copies of the papers that he signed. After he was removed to Mexico, the lawsuit claims that Montes was robbed in Mexicali at knifepoint of a suitcase of clothing. He snuck back in to the U.S. the next day with his wallet, and then turned himself to CBP. He was detained once again and deported back to Mexico. Montes has been living with family in Mexico since.

According to his attorneys, Mr. Montes came to the U.S. when he was 9 years old and since 2014 has been able to legally live and work in the country under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. According to the Department of Homeland Security, his DACA status had expired, and an illegal entry into the U.S. and a prior conviction for theft put his status in question. Montes has a minor traffic offense and one misdemeanor offense.

California recently passed a bill to protect undocumented immigrants who are the victims of crimes from being deported. California has the largest population of undocumented immigrants in the country at an estimated 2.45 million. The California Assembly passed the Immigrant Victims of Crime Equity Act, sponsored by Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins of San Diego and Senate President pro Tempore Kevin de León of Los Angeles. The bill is now headed to Governor Jerry Brown for signing. If signed by the governor, it will become state law.

S.B. 674 requires local and state law enforcement agencies to sign certifications for qualified immigrant crime victims when they have been helpful to the investigation of crimes like sexual assault and domestic violence. The certifications are prerequisites to an application for a Victim of Crime “U-Visa,” which is issued by the federal government to prevent deportation of victims of specific crimes who have been helpful to the investigation or prosecution. S.B. 674 also provides relief for victims of domestic violence. The intent of the Bill is to curb crime, since victims of crime tend to not report it or cooperate with law enforcement if they are in the country illegally. The bill is part of the sweeping Immigrants Shape California legislative package.

Under federal law, being in the country illegally is grounds for deportation. If S.B. 674 is passed, it would mean that victims of sexual crimes and domestic violence in California would not face potential deportation for reporting the crime.